Jose Pajarito Collaboration

 

Jose Pajarito, son of the late Nicasio Pajarito Gonzalez, is an artist from Tonala in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. Nicasio was a nationally celebrated artisan throughout his life, known as one of the “Grandes Maestros del Arte Popular Mexicano”.

Nicasio’s workshop is still operated today by his family. His son, Jose, focuses on flora and fauna motifs painted on pottery and plates made of “barro” or clay. He works in the regional styles of bruñido and canelo, and considers these mix of clays to be reflective of Mexico’s mestizo heritage.

 

For Heirlome, Jose recreated his traditional motifs using acrylic on draped dress silhouettes made of painter’s canvas. His work was digitized to print in fine silk by print designer Leila Dubus. 

Juana Gomez Ramirez Collaboration

 

Juana Gomez Ramirez is an artisan from Amatenango del Valle, in Chiapas Mexico. She is a celebrated artist in Mexico and is considered one of the 'Grandes Maestros del Arte Popular Iberoamericana'. Her specialty is 'Modelado y Poliocromado'.

 

Since the age of nine, Ms. Gomez Ramirez has been sculpting and painting on a clay known as "barro". She works in pre-Hispanic methods when working with clay, a tradition from the region where she lives. The clay is hand extracted from the mountains very early in the morning. The artisans dig three meters deep to get the best material and then prepared it by mixing it with water and soil, and then sculpt the next day.

 

After decades of work, Ms. Gomez Ramirez achieved national recognition with her now famous 'Jaguares'. Hand-sculpted and painted jaguars, known for their unique 'mechitas' or hand-drawn spots.

 

For Heirlome, Juana recreated her jaguars by using ink on a canvas draped dress. Her artwork was digitized for prints in fine silk by print designer Jovana Mirabile.

Heirlome is committed to supporting and collaborating with artisans in Mexico and Latin America. Each season introduces a new artist’s work, explored through print, pattern and embroidery.

 

The artists in Mexico use traditional techniques in their art that have been passed down from generation to generation. A lot of precision and hand work goes into creating these works. When making prints we respect their work by retracing every stroke, every imperfection. Respecting the authenticity of the work, while giving it our modern approach to dressing.

 

Creative Director and founder, Stephanie Suberville, was born and raised in Mexico. Her fascination for her culture has always been at the root of launching this brand. We hope to help support these communities so that they can continue to keep their unique art form alive. We are encouraged by these talented artists, to help promote their work, and turn it into wearable art.

Rebozos by Arturo Estrada

 

Arturo Estrada is a Mexican artisan, a 'Rebozo' maker with over 40 years of experience from Santa Maria del Rio in San Luis Potosi. A rebozo is a special woven shawl-like garment, traditionally woven by indigenous weavers, generation after generation.

 

Mr. Estrada began making rebozos at the age of 9, when he joined the 'Escuela del Rebozo'. He is now a teacher and Head of the School, teaching the next generation this very traditional craft. Artisans in Santa Maria del Rio specialize in silk, while other areas in Mexico focus on cotton. Due to a change in government, the artisans in Santa Maria had not had access to silk, as they have relied on the government for decades to source the yarns.

 

As a collaboration with Heirlome, Mr. Estrada is starting to weave again in silk. Silk yarns are sourced via Heirlome, shipped to Mexico where Mr. Estrada and his team work up to three months in the creation of each one.

 

Heirlome rebozos are available in Ivory or 'Crudo' meaning un-dyed, raw silk and Black or 'De Luto' traditionally used for mourning.

Heirlome is committed to supporting and collaborating with artisans in Mexico and Latin America. Each season introduces a new artist’s work, explored through print, pattern and embroidery.

 

The artists in Mexico use traditional techniques in their art that have been passed down from generation to generation. A lot of precision and hand work goes into creating these works. When making prints we respect their work by retracing every stroke, every imperfection. Respecting the authenticity of the work, while giving it our modern approach to dressing.

 

Creative Director and founder, Stephanie Suberville, was born and raised in Mexico. Her fascination for her culture has always been at the root of launching this brand. We hope to help support these communities so that they can continue to keep their unique art form alive. We are encouraged by these talented artists, to help promote their work, and turn it into wearable art.

Jose Pajarito Collaboration

 

Jose Pajarito, son of the late Nicasio Pajarito Gonzalez, is an artist from Tonala in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. Nicasio was a nationally celebrated artisan throughout his life, known as one of the “Grandes Maestros del Arte Popular Mexicano”.

Nicasio’s workshop is still operated today by his family. His son, Jose, focuses on flora and fauna motifs painted on pottery and plates made of “barro” or clay. He works in the regional styles of bruñido and canelo, and considers these mix of clays to be reflective of Mexico’s mestizo heritage.

 

For Heirlome, Jose recreated his traditional motifs using acrylic on draped dress silhouettes made of painter’s canvas. His work was digitized to print in fine silk by print designer Leila Dubus. 

Rebozos by Arturo Estrada

 

Arturo Estrada is a Mexican artisan, a 'Rebozo' maker with over 40 years of experience from Santa Maria del Rio in San Luis Potosi. A rebozo is a special woven shawl-like garment, traditionally woven by indigenous weavers, generation after generation.

 

Mr. Estrada began making rebozos at the age of 9, when he joined the 'Escuela del Rebozo'. He is now a teacher and Head of the School, teaching the next generation this very traditional craft. Artisans in Santa Maria del Rio specialize in silk, while other areas in Mexico focus on cotton. Due to a change in government, the artisans in Santa Maria had not had access to silk, as they have relied on the government for decades to source the yarns.

 

As a collaboration with Heirlome, Mr. Estrada is starting to weave again in silk. Silk yarns are sourced via Heirlome, shipped to Mexico where Mr. Estrada and his team work up to three months in the creation of each one.

 

Heirlome rebozos are available in Ivory or 'Crudo' meaning un-dyed, raw silk and Black or 'De Luto' traditionally used for mourning.

Juana Gomez Ramirez Collaboration

 

Juana Gomez Ramirez is an artisan from Amatenango del Valle, in Chiapas Mexico. She is a celebrated artist in Mexico and is considered one of the 'Grandes Maestros del Arte Popular Iberoamericana'. Her specialty is 'Modelado y Poliocromado'.

 

Since the age of nine, Ms. Gomez Ramirez has been sculpting and painting on a clay known as "barro". She works in pre-Hispanic methods when working with clay, a tradition from the region where she lives. The clay is hand extracted from the mountains very early in the morning. The artisans dig three meters deep to get the best material and then prepared it by mixing it with water and soil, and then sculpt the next day.

 

After decades of work, Ms. Gomez Ramirez achieved national recognition with her now famous 'Jaguares'. Hand-sculpted and painted jaguars, known for their unique 'mechitas' or hand-drawn spots.

 

For Heirlome, Juana recreated her jaguars by using ink on a canvas draped dress. Her artwork was digitized for prints in fine silk by print designer Jovana Mirabile.

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